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Healthy Lifestyle

  • Nutrition and Exercise When You Have HIV

    nutrition and exercise

    Good nutrition and exercise can enhance your health and reduce your HIV infection.

    What issues could make it hard for me to eat a healthy diet?

    You may experience difficulty eating if you have injuries in your mouth, diarrhea, nausea or poor appetite. when you experience difficulty eating or working out, speak with your specialist.

    What are some good tips for eating right?

    A couple of basic steps can help you ensure your food is healthy and safe:

    Here are some approaches to add nutrition to your diet:

    • Wash your hands with cleanser and water before you eat so you won’t get an infection from germs
    • Wash leafy foods or fruits before you eat them or cook them.
    • Wash your hands with soap and water after you touch raw fish, chicken or meat to help prevent infection.
    • Make sure that meat, eggs and fish are very much cooked before you eat them.
    • Have high-calorie protein drinks or shakes. Including powdered milk can build the nutrition in different drinks.
    • Drink 8 to 10 glasses of filtered water every day.
    • Keep nutritious snacks available, for example, nuts and carrot sticks.
    • Eat high-calorie foods in case you’re shedding pounds.
    • Call your specialist in the event that you lose 5 pounds or more when you didn’t plan to.
    • Discuss with your expert about taking a multivitamin regularly. Take your multivitamin with food to help keep away an irritated stomach.

    What would I do in case I’m experiencing difficulty eating?

    • If you don’t have an appetite— try to eat your most loved foods. Rather than eating 3 major meals every day, eat 6 to 8 little meals. Drink high-calorie protein shakes with your meals or between meals.
    • If you have diarrhea — don’t eat fried foods and other high-fat foods like potato chips. Likewise dodge high-fiber foods. Rather, eat plain foods, for example, bread, rice and fruit purée. Get some information about taking nutritional supplements.
    • If you have mouth bruises — Avoid citrus organic products like oranges and grapefruit. Stay away from exceptionally hot or cool foods. Try not to eat spicy foods. Make an effort not to eat hard foods like chips and pretzels. Use a straw to drink juices.
    • If you have nausea and vomiting — avoid drinking any fluid with your meal. Eat 6 to 8 little meals every day rather than 3 large meals. Eat foods with a soft flavor.
    • Eat foods at a moderate temperature, not very hot or cool.
    • Drink nutritional supplements and sports drinks.
    • Sit and relax for 30 minutes after you eat.

    How can I increase my strength?

    Aerobic exercise, for example, walking will help make you stronger. It’s great to start practicing gradually. Little by little, increase the measure of time that you walk. For instance, you may begin walking for 20 minutes 3 times each week. At that point, after you get somewhat stronger, you can build the walking time to 30 minutes 4 times each week.

    Speak with your doctor before you begin.

    Weight lifting is likewise a decent approach to increase your strength. Begin by attempting to do a weight lifting exercise with a weight sufficiently light that you can lift it 10 times. Lifting it once is known as a “repetition.” More than one repetition is known as a “set.” Try to do 2 sets of 10 repetitions.

    Rest for 90 seconds between each set.

    You don’t need fancy exercise hardware to do weight lifting. You can utilize soup or squeeze cans, books and different objects you have in the house. Begin by lifting a weight that is enjoyable for you and doesn’t bring about a lot of strain.

    In the first week, do 1 or 2 various weight lifting exercises for each body part now and then in the week. Begin with a little weight in each hand, similar to 10 to 15 ounces (a container of soup or a can of beans), depending on the exercise. Every week raise the amount of exercises you do and the number of times you exercise.

    Rest for 1 to 2 days between exercise sessions. When you’re feeling wiped out, either exercise less or stop for some time.

    Dumbbell bench press (for your chest, shoulders and the back of your arms)

    Lie on a seat on your back. Hold a dumbbell in each hand, with your hands agreeing with your shoulders. Have the palms of your hands facing down (toward your toes). Bring down the dumbbells until your elbows are beneath the bench. Try not to relax your arms at the base of this movement.

    When your elbows are as low as they can go, move your arms up again to the beginning position. Try not to “lock” your elbows at the point of the movement. (This implies, don’t make your arms be precisely straight — leave a minor little twist in your elbows.)

    Note that: You can use soup cans rather than dumbbells in these exercises.

    Crunches (for your abdomen)

    Lie on your back on the floor. Keep your feet on the floor and your knees twisted. Cross your arms over your chest. Presently raise only your head and shoulders from the floor. This is a little and moderate movement, similar to a curl. Your back remains on the floor. Gradually lower your head and shoulders back to the floor.

    When you are curling your head up, keep your chin up and your eyes taking a looking at the roof. You can add resistance to this exercise by holding a weight on your chest.

    Upright rows (for your shoulders, upper back and the front of your arms)

    Hold a dumbbell in each hand. Give your arms a chance to be straight and laying on the front of your thighs. Your palms facing your legs. Right now pull the dumbbells up to the level of your shoulders. Your elbows ought to go up first. At the point when your elbows are about even with your ears, bring down the dumbbells to your thighs once more. Keep your knees bent only a slight piece.

    Try not to give yourself a chance to lean in back.

    Lunge (for the front and back of your legs and your rump)

    Hold a dumbbell in each hand. Hold your arms down at your sides. Your palms ought to face your legs. Your feet need to be even with your shoulders. Step forward with your left leg. Bring down your right knee until its 1 inch over the floor. Now straighten your left leg and go back to the beginning position.

    Repeat on the other leg. Keep in mind that the movement is up and down, not forward. Hold your back straight and your head up. Try not to give yourself a chance to lean forward.

    Remember that nutrition and exercises plays a greater role to fight against unwanted diseases in the body, following proper nutritional diets and exercises will help to boost the body’s immune system against deadly virus.

  • 5 Foods Cardiologists Want You To Avoid Eating

    safe exercisesDay in and day out cardiologists see the effects of what a poor diet can do to your heart. And keeping in mind that an occasional indulgence is fine—a glass of red wine here, a bit of chocolate there — there are certain types of foods cardiologist will never let pass their lips.

    Processed meats

    Bacon, hotdogs, sausages and ham, are many of Americans’ daily diets however Jennifer Haythe, MD, a cardiologist and college professor of Medicine at Columbia Presbyterian in New York City won’t go close to them. “These items are truly dripping with saturated fats.

    Also, we realize that sausage and processed meats have been connected to heart failure and cancer,” says Dr. Haythe. What precisely is in processed meat? Processed meat are meat that has been salted, treated, fermented or smoked to improve its shelf life.

    While these foods are fast and helpful, the chemicals and salt used as a part of processed foods are harmful for our hearts, particularly when eaten in bigger amounts. (Related: These are signs you’re eating excessive sodium.)

    Red Meat

    A delicate and juicy steak finished with mushrooms sauteed in butter is a meal you might need to reserve for an extraordinary event. “That delightful steak before you is loaded with saturated fats, cholesterol, and salt,” says Dr. Haythe.

    Dr. Haythe urges every one of her patients to eaten red meat to once per month. When you do eat red meat, look for leaner cuts like eye of round roast, top roast, top sirloin, and sirloin tips. Use spices and herbs for flavor and avoid butter, cream, and hollandaise sauces. Meatless meals can be filling and delightful. Look at these top sources of plant-based protein.

    Potato Chips

    It’s anything but difficult to plow through a pack of potato chips or a giant bowl buttered popcorn yet Dr. Haythe says these snacks can be eaten sized bits of trans-fats, sodium, and carbs. A study circulated in the New England Journal of Medicine found that 99.2 percent of individuals overall consume more than 2,000 milligrams of sodium every day. (Many health associations prescribe close to 1,500 milligrams per day.)

    People who consume more than 2,000 milligrams of sodium every day represent one in 10 cardiovascular deaths. Does this mean you need to surrender popcorn for your next Netflix binge? If you can’t surrender popcorn or chips altogether, take a stab at changing to baked chips as well as lightly salted and buttered popcorn.

    To monitor your portion, leave the sack of chips or popcorn in the kitchen and place a snack in asingle serving bowl. You’ll most likely eat less if you were eating from the sack bowl.

    Pizza

    A week by week pizza night is something most of us expect. Sadly, the main thing we’re getting from the pizzeria is a “giant carbohydrate with salt and processed cheese,” says Dr. Haythe. You don’t need to surrender your most loved dinner of the week, simply order a more beneficial version with mushrooms, peppers, extra sauce, hold the pepperoni. Another alternative is to make a healthier kind at home. “Use whole wheat crust, olive oil, and fresh goat cheese,” says Dr. Haythe.

    Table Salt

    It appears our taste buds aren’t fulfilled unless we shake salt on our food or discover it in a pack of salty chips, however salt can cause issues with blood pressure. If your pulse is too high, your arteries can become solid and contracted, bringing about a greater possibility of heart disease. Dr. Koshy doesn’t add salt to any food or when she cooks.

    She doesn’t have a salt shaker on the table. “It doesn’t make a difference what sort of salt it is—Himalayan sea salt or pink salt—if it has salt in its name, it is no good.” If you’re battling with high blood pressure, restrict your salt intake and give your salt-wanting taste buds to spices like cumin, curry, garlic, rosemary, cinnamon, and so on.

    The outcomes could be significant in lowering high blood pressure. “Normally, if individuals with high pulse remove salt from their diet, their blood pressure will drop enough that they needn’t bother with medication,” says Koshy.